"There is danger from all men. The only maxim of a free government ought to be to trust no man living with
power to endanger the public liberty." - - - - John Adams

Tuesday, December 1, 2015

Cops Now Steal More Than Robbers

 "Corruptus in Extremis"

(Reason.com)  -  One of the most troubling recent scenes from Sacramento came as the California state legislature reached the end of its session. A simple bill that would rein in abuses of the civil-asset forfeiture processi.e., when police agencies take property from people, even if they've never been accused of a crimecame far short of passage after the law-enforcement lobby pulled out all the stops. The final vote was about money, not justice.

Police organizations argued they would lose a significant amount of funding if a law passed requiring that they secure a conviction before taking property. They often take homes, cars and cash from people after claiming the property was used in the commission of a crime. They need only prove the low standard of "probable cause." (For instance, one Anaheim couple almost lost a $1.5 million commercial building after an undercover cop bought $37 in marijuana from a tenant, but the feds dropped that case after bad publicity.)

Created in the early days of the nation's war on drugs, asset forfeiture was designed to grab the proceeds from drug kingpins. But most of the money now is grabbed from ordinary citizens. According to a study last year, about 80 percent of the time, seized property is taken from people who have never been charged with anything. That same study, by the Drug Policy Alliance, found wanton abuses in California cities. Police are not supposed to budget forfeiture proceeds, but they increasingly depend on the revenues to fund their operations.
The study also found "multiple instances of cash grabs by law enforcement being incentivized over deterring drug sales, wherein police wait until a drug sale concludes and then seize the cash proceeds of the sale rather than the drugs, as drugs must be destroyed and are of no monetary value to law enforcement." It also found that some Los Angeles County cities "were found to be prioritizing asset forfeiture over general public safety concerns … ." In other words, police skew their policing strategies around these lucrative takings.
California's law actually requires, in property seizures of more than $25,000, that the police agency gain a conviction and the legal standard requires proof beyond a reasonable doubt. California law-enforcement agencies don't like that higher standard, so they circumvent the state law. They participate in something called "equitable sharing"i.e., they invite the feds into their operation, take the property using the lower federal standard, and then split the loot.
An economic consulting firm reported on data last week showing that the approximately $4.5 billion in annual forfeitures now exceeds the $3.9 billion Americans lose in robberies each year. The clear point: Your local police or sheriff's department is more likely to take your stuff than a robber. The Institute for Justice report found the problem getting worse. "It's exploding, despite the fact that the issue is getting a lot of attention," said Dick Carpenter, one of the study's authors. According to the report, forfeiture revenues have more than doubled between 2002 to 2013. California agencies collected approximately $280 million over the 11-year study periodand an additional $696 million by partnering with federal agencies.
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