"There is danger from all men. The only maxim of a free government ought to be to trust no man living with
power to endanger the public liberty." - - - - John Adams

Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Arizona Passes Bill Supporting Gold & Silver Money

"Of all the contrivances for cheating the laboring classes of mankind, none has been more effective than that which deludes them with paper money."
Senator Daniel Webster
Federalist Party

PHOENIX, Ariz. (Tenth Amendment Center) – An Arizona bill that would eliminate state capital gains taxes on gold and silver specie, and encourage its use as currency, passed the House today. Final approval of the legislation would help undermine the Federal Reserve’s monopoly on money.
Rep. Mark Finchem (R-Tucson) introduced House Bill 2014 (HB2014) on Jan. 9. The legislation would eliminate state capital gains taxes on income “derived from the exchange of one kind of legal tender for another kind of legal tender.” The bill defines legal tender as “a medium of exchange, including specie, that is authorized by the United States Constitution or Congress for the payment of debts, public charges, taxes and dues.” “Specie” means coins having precious metal content.
In effect, passage of the bill would “legalize the Constitution” by treating gold and silver specie as money.
HB2014 passed the full House by a 35-24 vote.
Under current Arizona law, gold and silver are subject to capital gains tax when exchanged for Federal Reserve notes, or when used in barter transactions. If the purchasing power of the Federal Reserve note has decreased due to inflation, the metals’ nominal dollar value generally rises and that triggers a “gain.” In most cases, of course, the capital gain is purely fictional. But these “gains” are still taxed — thus unfairly punishing people using precious metals as money.
The Olden Days
When Gold and Silver was Money

When gold and silver was money somehow the sun came up every day, children played, businesses did business, people went to work and lived their lives.  But our ever so smart economists from the very best schools (who think loaning money to Greece is a good idea) tell us we are the "crazy" ones for wanting a stable gold backed currency and balanced budgets.  

A Step Forward
Passage of HB2014 would allow Arizonans to deduct the amount of any net capital gain derived from the exchange of one kind of legal tender for another kind of legal tender or specie (gold and silver coins) from their gross income on their state income tax. In other words, individuals buying gold or silver bullion, or utilizing gold and silver in a transaction, would no longer be subject to state taxes on the exchange.
Passage into law would mark an important step towards currency competition. If sound money gains a foothold in the marketplace against Federal Reserve notes, the people would be able to choose the time-tested stability of gold and silver over the central bank’s rapidly-depreciating paper currency. The freedom of choice expanded by HB2014 would allow Arizona residents to secure the purchasing power of their money.
“This isn’t going to end the fed’s monetary monopoly overnight, but it sets the foundation and opens the door for more market activity by the people,” Tenth Amendment Center executive director Michael Boldin said. “This is an important part of the overall strategy, and activists in Arizona should continue working to get both bills passed.”
Currently, all debts and taxes in Arizona must be paid with either Federal Reserve Notes (dollars), authorized as legal tender by Congress, or with coins issued by the U.S. Treasury — very few of which have gold or silver in them.
But the United States Constitution states in Article I, Section 10, “No State shall…make any Thing but gold and silver Coin a Tender in Payment of Debts.”
Read More . . . .

The gold solidus of Roman Emperor Valentinian II, 375-392 AD.
Even though the empire died long ago, this 1,600 year
old gold coin still holds its value today.

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

So they must not do that .As the Constitution bans that on .