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NEWS AND VIEWS THAT IMPACT LIMITED CONSTITUTIONAL GOVERNMENT

"There is danger from all men. The only maxim of a free government ought to be to trust no man living with
power to endanger the public liberty." - - - - John Adams

Monday, June 11, 2012

Lazy Americans paid not to work


There is a huge farm labor shortage in California, but Americans are too damn lazy to work.


Lazy Americans  -  "It boils down to the fact that if labor continues as it is now … the ability to get a wide variety of food to table is somewhat in jeopardy."   - - - Chuck Dudley, President of the Yolo County Farm Bureau
  • Millions and millions of Americans are paid by the government NOT to work while we do not have enough workers to harvest our own crops.
  • But why work when a bi-partisan Marxist government re-distributes the wealth by giving out free rent, free food, free medical care and so much more.


In a horrible economy there are California agriculture jobs everywhere with no takers.  Why?  Americans of all races are lazy bastards and do not want to get their hands dirty with real work.  Add in that the government pays Americans not to work and you see why Greece in bankrupt.
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It was not that long ago that Americans of all races planted and harvested their own crops.  They still do it in other nations.  The Chinese manage to harvest their own crops.  As do the South Africans, Hungarians and Turks.
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But in the U.S. the work ethic has nearly been killed off by government.  See our article THE FEDERALIST - "The Conservative Welfare State."
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Kevin Steward has spent more than a quarter-century in agriculture, much of that growing grapes for wineries. He's always been able to rely on seasonal workers to tend the vines and bring in the year's harvest.
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But this year, workers are harder to come by.  "I could use 30 men," Steward said. "We'll get 'er done, but I can't find anybody."
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Growers throughout the fertile Central Valley are wringing their hands as they struggle to find the manpower they need.
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Steward, president of the Sacramento County Farm Bureau, said he has only a fraction of the 40 workers he depends on to tend the 1,000 acres of vineyards he manages in Amador and San Joaquin counties.
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"I've never seen it this bad," he said, though he's heard that there are "a lot of good workers who are busy picking cherries."
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But cherry growers say their labor situation is only marginally better.
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Laborers available to harvest San Joaquin County's lucrative cherry crop are down as much as 30 percent, according to the county's farm bureau. At cherry grower Rutledge Farms in Woodbridge, near Lodi, 60 laborers are doing the work that 80 or 90 would in a typical year.
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San Joaquin County is an agricultural powerhouse in California built on dairy, wine grapes, tree nuts and the sweet cherries being picked now. The county's sweet-cherry crop alone is valued at more than $185.5 million, according to the California Farm Bureau.

Read more here: http://www.bellinghamherald.com/2012/06/04/2549020/californias-central-valley-farmers.html#storylink=cpy

Read more here: http://www.bellinghamherald.com/2012/06/04/2549020/californias-central-Steward, president of the Sacramento County Farm Bureau, said he has only a fraction of the 40 workers he depends on to tend the 1,000 acres of vineyards he manages in Amador and San Joaquin counties.
"I've never seen it this bad," he said, though he's heard that there are "a lot oBut now all of that has changed. Back in 1950,
more than 80 percent of all men in the United States had jobs. Today,less than 65 percent of all men in the United States have jobs.f good workers who are busy picking cherries."
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California Farm Bureau officials say that as many as 225,000 workers toil on the state's farmland, a number that typically grows to about 450,000 by the heavy harvest season in September.
Farm labor contractors saw warning signs as early as last year's grape harvest when a late season stretched the labor supply to the limit, said Guadalupe Sandoval, managing director of the Sacramento-based California Farm Labor Contractor Association.
"Things didn't ripen until late so everybody needed workers at the same time," Sandoval said. "There weren't enough crews out there. That was our canary in the coal mine."












Read more here: http://www.bellinghamherald.com/2012/06/04/2549020/californias-central-valley-farmers.html#storylink=cpy
cherry growers say their labor situation is only marginally better.
Laborers available to harvest San Joaquin County's lucrative cherry crop are down as much as 30 percent, according to the county's farm bureau. At cherry grower Rutledge Farms in Woodbridge, near Lodi, 60 laborers are doing the work that 80 or 90 would in a typical year.
San Joaquin County is an agricultural powerhouse in California built on dairy, wine grapes, tree nuts and the sweet cherries being picked now. The county's sweet-cherry crop alone is valued at more than $185.5 million, according to the California Farm Bureau.

Read more here: http://www.bellinghamherald.com/2012/06/04/2549020/californias-central-valley-farmers.html#storylink=cpy
valley-farmers.html#storylink=cpy


Americans no longer want to work.
Hector Sanchez picks cherries at Rutledge Farms in Woodbridge, near Lodi. He and his co-workers drive more than two hours to work from Madera, starting at 3 a.m. Farmers in San Joaquin County say they are short of workers this year as they attempt to get crops harvested.


California Farm Bureau officials say that as many as 225,000 workers toil on the state's farmland, a number that typically grows to about 450,000 by the heavy harvest season in September.
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Farm labor contractors saw warning signs as early as last year's grape harvest when a late season stretched the labor supply to the limit, said Guadalupe Sandoval, managing director of the Sacramento-based California Farm Labor Contractor Association.
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"Things didn't ripen until late so everybody needed workers at the same time," Sandoval said. "There weren't enough crews out there. That was our canary in the coal mine."

It was not that long ago that Americans of all races and ethnic groups planted and harvested their own crops.  Now the government pays people not to work.



Read more here: http://www.bellinghamherald.com/2012/06/04/2549020/californias-central-valley-farmers.html#storylink=cpy
It's not clear if farm labor shortages will continue.  Lawmakers have battled for years about various immigration reform strategies, including the guest-worker programs favored by many in the agricultural industry.  But the idea of having Americans do farm work never enters into the heads of Elite Socialists from the big cities.
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But Chuck Dudley, president of the Yolo County Farm Bureau, said the implications for American food consumers are severe if shortages worsen.
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"It boils down to the fact that if labor continues as it is now … the ability to get a wide variety of food to table is somewhat in jeopardy," Dudley said. "If you don't get it planted, picked and packed, it won't get to the table."

Read more here: http://www.bellinghamherald.com/2012/06/04/2549020/californias-central-valley-farmers.html#storylink=cpy


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In 1950 over 80% of men worked.  That is now down to less than 65%.


The work ethic has been undermined by the welfare state. Back in 1950, more than 80 percent of all men in the United States had jobs. Today,less than 65 percent of all men in the United States have jobs.
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Back in 2007, approximately 10 percent of all unemployed Americans had been out of work for one year or longer.  Today, that figure is above 30 percent.
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The average duration of unemployment in the United States today is about three times as long as it was back in the year 2000.
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As labor has become a global commodity, millions upon millions of U.S. jobs have been sent overseas. Today, you are not just competing for a job with your neighbors. You are also competing with workers on the other side of the globe. Unfortunately, it is legal to pay slave labor wages in many of those countries. By sending our jobs out of the country, big corporations can also avoid a whole host of rules, regulations, taxes and benefit payments that they would be facing if they hired American workers.
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(Sacramento Bee)


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Have no fear.  Obama is here.
With the help of Comrade Obama and a bi-partisan Congress you don't need to work.  The Marxist re-distribution of the wealth will give you food stamps, free housing, free medical and more.


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